Emalee Brown–Albion Middle School Teacher of the Year 2019-20

On any given day of the week, Emalee Brown makes Albion Middle better. In her Family and Consumer Science classroom, she may be leading her students as they plan a menu and market their own food trucks. Down the hallway, she may be pulling costumes for the school’s musical, or attending one of the school’s many after-school rehearsals. She might give some guidance to the Student Body Officers, as their sponsor, and make sure they are on top of the school’s cereal drive for low-income elementary students over winter break. At the end of it all, Brown is supportive to both her students and her peers, and for these reasons, Albion Middle has chosen Emalee Brown as the 2019 Teacher of the Year.

We’re Hiring • CSD’s Special Education Teachers Qualify for $7K in Stipends

Considering a career in special education? Consider this: Qualified special education teachers in Canyons District can earn up to $7,100 in stipends on top of their regular salary. Last year, 130 of CSD’s teachers with a bachelor’s or advanced degree in special education qualified for legislatively-approved $4,100 stipends through the Utah State Board of Education. Additionally, 62 CSD teachers in self-contained classrooms received District-funded stipends of $3,000 for undergoing special training. In all, these teachers benefitted to the tune of about $720,000. And that comes on top of two consecutive years of sizeable teacher pay increases approved by the Canyons Board of Education, says CSD’s Special Education Director Misty Suarez. “These stipends aren’t just a one-time deal. Qualified teachers are eligible to receive them every year, which has given us a real recruiting edge. I can’t think of a better time to consider a career in special education.” Read more at canyonsdistrict.org.

 

 

It’s Testing Season in Utah’s Schools: Here’s What Parents and Students Should Know

 

It never fails. Each spring, with the arrival of the first crocus blooms to emerge from the cool, rain-soaked ground, comes end-of-year testing season in Utah’s schools. But this season, students will be taking a new set of Utah State Board of Education-required assessments to demonstrate how much they have learned over the course of the year. The exam for students in grades 3-8 is called RISE, an acronym that stands for Readiness, Improvement, Success and Empowerment. Ninth- through 10th-grade students will participate in a high school assessment called Utah Aspire Plus, which is designed to prepare them for the ACT, the most commonly used college-entrance exam. What do the results mean, and why should students and parents care? Answers to these questions and more can be found on a new Canyons District resources page. Anyone curious about the how’s and why’s of testing is encouraged to browse the site, which contains teacher testimonials, testing tips, links to sample test questions, and more. “Testing has always been integral to education. Assessments inform instruction by helping teachers know if educational goals are being met,” says CSD’s Research and Assessment Director Dr. Hal Sanderson. “They’re an indicator of what’s working in the classroom and what can be done differently. Testing also gives parents a measure of their child’s learning, which, along with grades and other measures, helps answer the question: Is my child reaching expected learning targets and doing well compared to his or her peers?” Read more at canyonsdistrict.org.

 

 

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